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Around Tasmania Ocean Race OffShore Races

Tasmania, Australia
  • Event date: 15/02/2022
  • Event end: 03/03/2022
  • When: JAN-MAR
  • Duration: 2 weeks

Around Tasmania Ocean Race / 700 Nm / 16 Days / CAT 1 Race

Join the crew for a best of 7-leg Roaring 40’s Ocean Race around Australia’s southernmost island state of Tasmania. We’ll go head to head with two 70+ foot expedition yacht crews on Silver Fern and Salt Lines racing each other to claim the title of Around Tasmania Ocean Race Winner in this inaugural yacht race.

This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to undertake one of the world’s more adventurous and spectacular ocean race experiences. It is not for the fainthearted and the weather on the western and southern coasts can be extremely challenging. This race requires extensive preparation and considerable perseverance with the weather conditions we are likely to be dealt with en-route. The race route and recommended anchorages in between each leg, are based on careful research, professional meteorological advice and leveraging detailed local sailing knowledge.

Starting and finishing at Hobart, with 7 stopovers at memorable ports, islands and bays en-route, this challenge is as much about each leg of the race, as it is about each destination. The 14-day race plan ensures we have more than 50% available to go ashore and take in the natural beauty and iconic landmarks of Tasmania along the way.


The 7 legs of 2022 Around Tasmania Ocean Race are;

  1. The Iron Pot to Port Arthur 26nm

  2. Port Arthur to Wine Glass Bay 77nm

  3. Wine Glass Bay to Devonport 172nm

  4. Devonport to Hells Gate 220nm

  5. Hells Gate to Port Davey 85nm

  6. Port Davey to Kettering 97nm

  7. Kettering to Hobart 23nm

Secure your place on the crew with a 20% deposit.

Around Tasmania Ocean Race
Difficulty Level:
Medium
Price:

5750 $ AUD

AROUND TASMANIA OCEAN RACE / 700 NM / 15 FEB – 3 MAR 2022

16 DAYS / CAT 1 RACE / SILVER FERN & SALT LINES

You can fly directly into Hobart Airport on or before the 15th of February 2022. When you arrive we’ll familiarise you with the yacht, systems and safety equipment and you will join us for a crew dinner ashore. Our crew will officially assemble from the 16th of February onwards at Constitution Dock in downtown Hobart and we will aim to start leg 1 of the race at 12:00pm on the 17th of February once training is completed.

You are welcome to stay onboard from the date you arrive but if you plan to arrive prior to the 15th of February, you may need to arrange accommodation ashore. The goal is to complete the race by the 2nd of March and you can plan to fly out of Hobart from the 3rd of March onwards.

  • Leg 1: The Iron Pot to Port Arthur

  • Leg length: 26nm

With 7 legs of the race up for grabs and 4 leg wins required to take out the Around Tasmania Ocean Race Trophy, leg 1 offers the opportunity to get the first run on the board and a ‘first blood’ psychological advantage to the winning crew.

The start line for leg 1 of the Around Tasmania Ocean Race is set abeam The Iron Pot at the entrance to the Derwent River. The Iron Pot Lighthouse is significant for several reasons. It was the first lighthouse to be built in Tasmania and is the second oldest lighthouse ever built in Australia. It is also the oldest original tower in Australia and the first lighthouse in Australia to utilise a locally manufactured optical apparatus. It is also believed to be the first lighthouse to be converted to solar power in Australia.

The origin of the name Iron Pot continues to be a mystery. One theory is that whalers’ pots were left on the island from the early eighteenth century and this gave the island its name. Another is that it takes its name from the curiously formed pot like holes in the island. And a third theory is that there was a whale oil-fired beacon in old whaler’s tri-pot. The barren rocky island is small, about 0.4 hectares in area and marks the entrance to the Derwent River. The first beacon and signal station was manned by convicts and is believed to be on the nearby Betsy Island before being relocated to Iron Pot Island.

This 26nm leg takes us across Storm Bay with a finish mark at the entrance to Port Arthur. Upon completion of the leg, we will anchor at the nineteenth-century convict settlement of Port Arthur.

  • Leg 2: Port Arthur to Wine Glass Bay

  • Leg length: 77nm

Leg 2 provides unforgettable views of the towering dolerite cliffs of Cape Raoul, Cape Pillar and Tasman Island as we round the corner and race north along the East coast to Maria Island, through the stunning Schouten Passage with a finish mark set at the entrance to Wineglass Bay, where we will anchor, swim and enjoy a sheltered overnight stop before commencing leg 3. Wineglass Bay is part of the Freycinet Peninsula, an outcrop of wild, pristine coastland on Tasmania’s east coast. Encompassed within the Freycinet National Park, it is considered one of the top ten beaches in the world.

  • Leg 3: Wine Glass Bay to Devonport

  • Leg length: 172nm

On departing Wineglass Bay, leg 3 takes the yachts up the east coast, through Banks Strait on the northeast corner of Tasmania with a finish line at the entrance to the Mersey River and a stopover at the Mersey Yacht Club in the city of Devonport. This is the first big leg and requires some serious route planning to deal with adverse currents flowing around the NE corner of the island. In 1850, a settler named Oldaker occupied land at present-day Devonport. Sawmilling and coal mining developed with settlers arriving from England in 1854 onboard the sailing ship ‘Balmoral’. During the 1850s the twin settlements of Formby and Torquay were established on opposite banks at the mouth of the Mersey River.

  • Leg 4: Devonport to Hells Gates

  • Leg length: 220nm

This is the big of the race and it takes us into the Southern Ocean. Before departing Devonport we’ll make sure we have a suitable weather window for the leg around the north-west Tasmanian corner and passage south down the west coast, to finish at Hell’s Gates, the entrance to Macquarie Harbour. It is a notoriously shallow and dangerous channel entrance to the harbour. The name of the channel relates to the original convicts’ claim that it was their point of “entrance to Hell”, their Hell being the Macquarie Harbour Penal Station on Sarah Island and the outlying surrounds of the harbour.

From there we’ll motor through Hell’s Gates to the historical village of Strahan for our next stop. Originally developed as a port of access for the mining settlements in the area, the town was known as Long Bay or Regatta Point until 1877, when it was formally named after the colony’s Governor, Sir George Cumine Strahan. Strahan was a vital location for the timber industry that existed around Macquarie Harbour. For a substantial part of the nineteenth century and early twentieth century, it also was a port for regular shipping of passengers and cargo.

If time permits, we’ll motor 20nm up the Gordon River. The feeling of wilderness isolation the Gordon River offers is unlike anything else you may have experienced, with its extreme gorges and lush rainforest.

  • Leg 5: Hells Gates to Port Davey

  • Leg length: 85nm

Leg 5 is all Southern Ocean and it takes us from Hells Gates, down the southwest coast to Port Davey, one of Australia’s great cruising destinations, with its sparkling white quartzite mountains and tea-coloured water. Upon finishing at Port Davey, we’ll enter Bathurst Harbour for an overnight stop at Claytons Corner and a visit to the historic homestead of Win and Clyde Clayton. The Port Davey region of Southwest Tasmania is one of the most spectacular landscapes on the planet, with wild rivers, quartzite peaks and extensive waterways. There are no roads in this area – it is only accessible by foot, boat or light aircraft. Bathurst Harbour, a sheltered waterway south of Port Davey, is a Marine Nature Reserve and part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.

  • Leg 6: Port Davey to Kettering

  • Leg length: 97nm

The penultimate leg of the race takes us from Port Davey along the south coast of Tasmania to the sheltered anchorage of Kettering a coastal town on the D’Entrecasteaux Channel opposite Bruny Island. This leg will be challenging with southern ocean swells, inner harbour channels, currents and wind shadows to deal with. It offers the biggest variation of weather and will require excellent navigation to sail the smartest course. We’ll tie up overnight at the Oyster Cove Marina and head ashore to the popular Oyster Cove Inn for dinner.

The area was explored by Bruni D’Entrecasteaux in 1792 and was settled in the early 19th century by timber cutters, whalers and sealers. Life was hard and the people who lived in the area rarely settled for long preferring the life in Hobart Town to the whaling stations and logging camps. It was just north of Kettering in Oyster Cove that the last Tasmanian Aboriginal settlement was established in 1847.

  • Leg 7: Kettering to Hobart

  • Leg length: 23nm

The final leg of the race (and decider if scores are not 3-3) will be a sprint along the final stretch of the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, past The Iron Pot and up the famous Derwent River (where fortunes are made or lost at the end of the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race) to the finish line opposite Constitution Dock, before heading for an end-of-race prize-giving dinner at the Customs House in Hobart.

Founded in 1804 as a British penal colony, Hobart is Australia’s second-oldest capital city after Sydney, New South Wales. Whaling quickly emerged as a major industry in the area, and for a time Hobart served as the Southern Ocean’s main whaling port. Hobart is located in Tasmania’s southeast on the estuary of the River Derwent, making it the most southern of Australia’s capital cities. Its skyline is dominated by the 1,271-metre (4,170 ft) Kunanyi/Mount Wellington, and its harbour forms the second-deepest natural port in the world.

Your crew package includes:

  • all meals onboard
  • crew meals ashore in all anchorages and ports
  • accommodation onboard
  • your Ocean Sailing Expeditions crew shirt
  • marina fees
  • the use of a PFD (personal floatation device), PLB (personal locator beacon), and a safety tether
  • your bedding, a pillow and towel is also included along with suncream.

Your crew package excludes:

  • accommodation ashore
  • flights and transport to and from departure and arrival ports and visas
  • alcohol
  • toiletries
  • clothing and wet weather gear

You will need to complete a 2-day Sea Safety and Survival Training Course or equivalent Category 1 Course at least 2 months prior.

Its always recommended that you book flights with date flexibility in case of unforeseen changes due to weather or schedules. Accommodation options if you want to stay ashore either side of trip: AirBNBBooking.comWotif & HomeAway.

The Discover Tasmania website give you all kind of information about Tasmania

Boats
Program

AROUND TASMANIA OCEAN RACE / 700 NM / 15 FEB – 3 MAR 2022

16 DAYS / CAT 1 RACE / SILVER FERN & SALT LINES

You can fly directly into Hobart Airport on or before the 15th of February 2022. When you arrive we’ll familiarise you with the yacht, systems and safety equipment and you will join us for a crew dinner ashore. Our crew will officially assemble from the 16th of February onwards at Constitution Dock in downtown Hobart and we will aim to start leg 1 of the race at 12:00pm on the 17th of February once training is completed.

You are welcome to stay onboard from the date you arrive but if you plan to arrive prior to the 15th of February, you may need to arrange accommodation ashore. The goal is to complete the race by the 2nd of March and you can plan to fly out of Hobart from the 3rd of March onwards.

Leg 1
  • Leg 1: The Iron Pot to Port Arthur

  • Leg length: 26nm

With 7 legs of the race up for grabs and 4 leg wins required to take out the Around Tasmania Ocean Race Trophy, leg 1 offers the opportunity to get the first run on the board and a ‘first blood’ psychological advantage to the winning crew.

The start line for leg 1 of the Around Tasmania Ocean Race is set abeam The Iron Pot at the entrance to the Derwent River. The Iron Pot Lighthouse is significant for several reasons. It was the first lighthouse to be built in Tasmania and is the second oldest lighthouse ever built in Australia. It is also the oldest original tower in Australia and the first lighthouse in Australia to utilise a locally manufactured optical apparatus. It is also believed to be the first lighthouse to be converted to solar power in Australia.

The origin of the name Iron Pot continues to be a mystery. One theory is that whalers’ pots were left on the island from the early eighteenth century and this gave the island its name. Another is that it takes its name from the curiously formed pot like holes in the island. And a third theory is that there was a whale oil-fired beacon in old whaler’s tri-pot. The barren rocky island is small, about 0.4 hectares in area and marks the entrance to the Derwent River. The first beacon and signal station was manned by convicts and is believed to be on the nearby Betsy Island before being relocated to Iron Pot Island.

This 26nm leg takes us across Storm Bay with a finish mark at the entrance to Port Arthur. Upon completion of the leg, we will anchor at the nineteenth-century convict settlement of Port Arthur.

Leg 2
  • Leg 2: Port Arthur to Wine Glass Bay

  • Leg length: 77nm

Leg 2 provides unforgettable views of the towering dolerite cliffs of Cape Raoul, Cape Pillar and Tasman Island as we round the corner and race north along the East coast to Maria Island, through the stunning Schouten Passage with a finish mark set at the entrance to Wineglass Bay, where we will anchor, swim and enjoy a sheltered overnight stop before commencing leg 3. Wineglass Bay is part of the Freycinet Peninsula, an outcrop of wild, pristine coastland on Tasmania’s east coast. Encompassed within the Freycinet National Park, it is considered one of the top ten beaches in the world.

Leg 3
  • Leg 3: Wine Glass Bay to Devonport

  • Leg length: 172nm

On departing Wineglass Bay, leg 3 takes the yachts up the east coast, through Banks Strait on the northeast corner of Tasmania with a finish line at the entrance to the Mersey River and a stopover at the Mersey Yacht Club in the city of Devonport. This is the first big leg and requires some serious route planning to deal with adverse currents flowing around the NE corner of the island. In 1850, a settler named Oldaker occupied land at present-day Devonport. Sawmilling and coal mining developed with settlers arriving from England in 1854 onboard the sailing ship ‘Balmoral’. During the 1850s the twin settlements of Formby and Torquay were established on opposite banks at the mouth of the Mersey River.

Leg 4
  • Leg 4: Devonport to Hells Gates

  • Leg length: 220nm

This is the big of the race and it takes us into the Southern Ocean. Before departing Devonport we’ll make sure we have a suitable weather window for the leg around the north-west Tasmanian corner and passage south down the west coast, to finish at Hell’s Gates, the entrance to Macquarie Harbour. It is a notoriously shallow and dangerous channel entrance to the harbour. The name of the channel relates to the original convicts’ claim that it was their point of “entrance to Hell”, their Hell being the Macquarie Harbour Penal Station on Sarah Island and the outlying surrounds of the harbour.

From there we’ll motor through Hell’s Gates to the historical village of Strahan for our next stop. Originally developed as a port of access for the mining settlements in the area, the town was known as Long Bay or Regatta Point until 1877, when it was formally named after the colony’s Governor, Sir George Cumine Strahan. Strahan was a vital location for the timber industry that existed around Macquarie Harbour. For a substantial part of the nineteenth century and early twentieth century, it also was a port for regular shipping of passengers and cargo.

If time permits, we’ll motor 20nm up the Gordon River. The feeling of wilderness isolation the Gordon River offers is unlike anything else you may have experienced, with its extreme gorges and lush rainforest.

Leg 5
  • Leg 5: Hells Gates to Port Davey

  • Leg length: 85nm

Leg 5 is all Southern Ocean and it takes us from Hells Gates, down the southwest coast to Port Davey, one of Australia’s great cruising destinations, with its sparkling white quartzite mountains and tea-coloured water. Upon finishing at Port Davey, we’ll enter Bathurst Harbour for an overnight stop at Claytons Corner and a visit to the historic homestead of Win and Clyde Clayton. The Port Davey region of Southwest Tasmania is one of the most spectacular landscapes on the planet, with wild rivers, quartzite peaks and extensive waterways. There are no roads in this area – it is only accessible by foot, boat or light aircraft. Bathurst Harbour, a sheltered waterway south of Port Davey, is a Marine Nature Reserve and part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.

Leg 6
  • Leg 6: Port Davey to Kettering

  • Leg length: 97nm

The penultimate leg of the race takes us from Port Davey along the south coast of Tasmania to the sheltered anchorage of Kettering a coastal town on the D’Entrecasteaux Channel opposite Bruny Island. This leg will be challenging with southern ocean swells, inner harbour channels, currents and wind shadows to deal with. It offers the biggest variation of weather and will require excellent navigation to sail the smartest course. We’ll tie up overnight at the Oyster Cove Marina and head ashore to the popular Oyster Cove Inn for dinner.

The area was explored by Bruni D’Entrecasteaux in 1792 and was settled in the early 19th century by timber cutters, whalers and sealers. Life was hard and the people who lived in the area rarely settled for long preferring the life in Hobart Town to the whaling stations and logging camps. It was just north of Kettering in Oyster Cove that the last Tasmanian Aboriginal settlement was established in 1847.

Leg 7
  • Leg 7: Kettering to Hobart

  • Leg length: 23nm

The final leg of the race (and decider if scores are not 3-3) will be a sprint along the final stretch of the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, past The Iron Pot and up the famous Derwent River (where fortunes are made or lost at the end of the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race) to the finish line opposite Constitution Dock, before heading for an end-of-race prize-giving dinner at the Customs House in Hobart.

Founded in 1804 as a British penal colony, Hobart is Australia’s second-oldest capital city after Sydney, New South Wales. Whaling quickly emerged as a major industry in the area, and for a time Hobart served as the Southern Ocean’s main whaling port. Hobart is located in Tasmania’s southeast on the estuary of the River Derwent, making it the most southern of Australia’s capital cities. Its skyline is dominated by the 1,271-metre (4,170 ft) Kunanyi/Mount Wellington, and its harbour forms the second-deepest natural port in the world.

Inclusions

Your crew package includes:

  • all meals onboard
  • crew meals ashore in all anchorages and ports
  • accommodation onboard
  • your Ocean Sailing Expeditions crew shirt
  • marina fees
  • the use of a PFD (personal floatation device), PLB (personal locator beacon), and a safety tether
  • your bedding, a pillow and towel is also included along with suncream.
Exclusions

Your crew package excludes:

  • accommodation ashore
  • flights and transport to and from departure and arrival ports and visas
  • alcohol
  • toiletries
  • clothing and wet weather gear

You will need to complete a 2-day Sea Safety and Survival Training Course or equivalent Category 1 Course at least 2 months prior.

Its always recommended that you book flights with date flexibility in case of unforeseen changes due to weather or schedules. Accommodation options if you want to stay ashore either side of trip: AirBNBBooking.comWotif & HomeAway.

Tips

The Discover Tasmania website give you all kind of information about Tasmania

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